The Capitol acknowledges the people of the Woi wurrung and Boon wurrung language groups of the eastern Kulin Nation on whose unceded lands we conduct the business of the University. We respectfully acknowledge their Ancestors and Elders, past and present. We also acknowledge the Traditional Custodians and their Ancestors of the lands and waters across Australia where we conduct our business.

Cabinets of Curiosities

Drawing from the RMIT Design Archives (RDA), Australian Film Institute Research Collection (AFIRC) and RMIT Art Collection, the cabinets in the Salon and Lounge at The Capitol provide a small sampling of work from RMIT’s extraordinary cultural collections and resources.

Highlights include the RDA’s presentation from the All Australian Graffiti collection, the innovative design collective founded by Mimmo Cozzolino and Con Aslanis in 1972; RDA’s selection of record covers by graphic designers such as Geoffrey Digby, Robert Haberfield, Max Robinson and Lance Stirling from The World Record Club; and pieces from the AFIRC’s archive of coming-of-age Aussie classic Puberty Blues (1981), directed by Bruce Beresford.

About:

The AFI Research Collection is a specialist film and television industry resource open to the public. The collection’s scope is worldwide, with a focus on the Australian screen. It was originally created by the Australian Film Institute (AACTA) in the 1970s. Since 2002 the collection has been housed at RMIT University.  It comprises curated newspaper clippings files, books, journals, film and television scripts, directories, reports, promotional material, film stills, poster and film festival catalogues.

The RMIT Design Archives actively collects material relating to Melbourne design from the twentieth century onwards, and is an integral part of a vibrant research centre in the heart of the city. Both digital and material, the collections represent historical and contemporary practices which tell the story of Melbourne as a design city, and provide the resources and support for research into Melbourne’s designed environment, design professions and practices.

The RMIT Art Collection reflects the broad mission of the University, provides a cultural resource for staff, students and the community, and serves as an educational and research resource to the University. For more than 125 years, it has served as a source of inspiration, encompassing some of the finest examples of modern and contemporary art in Australia.

Read More

Manifest: Future Interior Design Provocations

Between the inter-war years of 1918 and 1938 European designers published manifestos for the world they wanted after the tumult of the first world war almost annually. Covid-19 precipitated global instability of a magnitude not seen since the great depression, presenting opportunities for emerging interior designers to consider and re-examine the ethics of practising design and the role of the interior designer in designing future interior situations and environments.

Twenty posters are to be exhibited in twenty locations across Melbourne and regional Victoria during Melbourne Design Week 2021. Each poster displays a students’ provocation that surfaced during the final year of their studies and proposes how they aspire to develop their practice and manifest the world they want as graduate interior designers.

The project is curated by RMIT Interior Design academics Ying-Lan Dann and Phoebe Whitman, alongside recent graduates Siobhan McCarthy and Samuel Safe, who have designed the graphics and website.

What is This?

An exhibition encompassing activated sculpture, performance, video, and sound in the collaborative work of artist and designer Anastasia La Fey and performance artist and choreographer Holly Durant. Innovative design developed through and beyond function, expands preconceived confines of “design” into realms that embrace artistic value, social & environmental attention and imaginative human experience.

The artists create an inhabitable space disrupting concrete definitions and formal delineations in design, opening fluid approaches intertwined with art and daily life that encourage communication, cooperation and change.

The artists would like to acknowledge the Wurundjeri, Djab Wurrung, Gunditjmara, and Gulidjan peoples of the Kulin Nation as the traditional custodians of the unceded lands and waters, on which they live, create and exhibit their work, and pay their respect to all First Nations Ancestors and Elders, past, present and emerging.

Presented by The Capitol and RMIT University School of Art present as part of Melbourne Design Week 2021, an initiative of the Victorian Government in collaboration with the NGV.

By Texture

By Texture: Locality and Identity in Melbourne is an exhibition of fabrics to explore the place we live in and promote conversation about identity and belonging. By creating casts and moulds of conventional surfaces unique to Melbourne and translating them into fabric prints, the exhibition provides a view of our city in a unique way, responding to the question of how materiality helps us to understand our surroundings and sustain our identity. The work provides a critical observation of the world we want, in which we recognise our culture materiality as a unique part of our social construct.

Presented by The Capitol, RMIT University School of Fashion & Textiles and School of Architecture & Urban Design as part of Melbourne Design Week 2021, an initiative of the Victorian Government in collaboration with the NGV.

Playing Ground

This exhibition invites people of all ages to imagine these changes by playing with a model landscape comprised of sand and an augmented reality display. 

As participants sculpt the sand, and the landform it represents, the visualisation reveals how water would flow and plants would grow across the hypothetical landscape. A number of prompts are provided that ask participants to experiment with the relationships between topography, ecology, hydrology, and sustainability. 

This event runs on a drop-in basis during the listed timeslots and participants are welcome to stay for as long, or as short, as their interest.

Presented by The Capitol and RMIT University School of Architecture & Urban Design as part of Melbourne Design Week 2021, an initiative of the Victorian Government in collaboration with the NGV.

Copper Traces in Time: Hold

Copper surfaces have been shown to have antimicrobial properties with COVID-19 no longer detected on it after only 4 hours. While the virus is active the copper discs will be a reminder to act with care. Once the virus has abated the discs will be markers of this time which has drastically changed the way people live and will continue to affect our future.

Come and share your story and receive a copper disc.

Presented by The Capitol and RMIT University School of Art as part of Melbourne Design Week 2021, an initiative of the Victorian Government in collaboration with the NGV.